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Archive for the ‘Books’ Category

Ten Questions with Polly LaBarre By Guy Kawasaki

Posted by suntzu on October 12, 2006

Guy Kawasaki’s blog is running a blog post where he interviews Polly LaBarre on her new book “Mavericks at Work: Why the Most Original Minds in Business Win

Guy, with is great ability of asking questions was able to dig out some of the key aspects of the book. The books is about identifying killer traits of people running amazing companies (Polly calls them Mavericks). There is a section where Guy asks “What’s your assessment of Steve Jobs?”. The answer to the question gets dragged more towards Pixar story

One of the big lessons of the book is that generosity begets prosperity. Mavericks are fierce competitors, but they’re also remarkably generous. They don’t believe that for them to win, others have to lose.

In short, the leader who figures out a way for everybody to win is the leader who wins. The leader with a zero-sum mentality gets zero.

A great blog post. Must read if you want to know all about forward looking companies and those running them (Mavericks)

Posted in Books, Business, Companies, Startup | Leave a Comment »

Ruby For Rails by David A Black – Book Review

Posted by suntzu on October 10, 2006

In his blog, Rob Sanheim wrote a review of “Ruby For Rails“. He rates this book above the esteemed PickAxe (ie Programming Ruby: Second Edition) book.

Some of the highlights of the books:

  • Modules and classes, control flow, exceptions, variables and methods
  • Role of self and how scope works in Ruby
  • Core libraries, regular expressions, and metaprogramming
  • Dynamic Ruby in chapter 13: “Ruby Dyna is a killer. This chapter has
    • covered Singleton classes and misconceptions around it
    • eval’s family of functions are fully covered
  • Procs and lambdas are explained well along with their relationship with blocks
  • Callbacks such as method_missing, included, and inherited are covered
  • Chapter 14 and 17 are the most Rail heavy section covering its domain model and technique for exploring Rails sources.

Some of lowlights of the books:

  • Auther is a bit verbose in some sections of the book
  • Reader is expected to have some background in Ruby programming
  • Expecting more meat in chapter 17: “Techniques for exploring the Rails souce code”

All in all, read the post if you want to get into the Rails development

Posted in Books, Programming, Startup | Leave a Comment »